New Zealand Herald – November 2009 (Get Real)

Sunday, November 8th, 2009

“There are red, decaying leaves, the spots of insect attack and edge-eating beetles mixed in with vigorous growth. The skill of the painting is undeniable and very attractive but these read less as symbols of mortality and more as an element of realism.” (T.J. McNamara, nzherald.co.nz)

Read the full review online.

Ponsonby News – November 2008 (Say It With Flowers)

Friday, November 28th, 2008

Ponsonby News - November 2008

“The breathtaking large paintings of flora create an amazing scale relationship with the viewer. Despite the size of the paintings Palmer still captures the very essence of the subject he decides to paint, through extraordinary focus on detail.”

– Ponsonby News

Download pdf [1.5mb]

New Zealand Herald – November 2008 (Say It With Flowers)

Saturday, November 8th, 2008

“The artist thrusts his plants uncompromisingly at us. Nowhere is this more apparent than in one long painting which is a grove of flax, dense enough to hide in with the growth patterns of its leaves making a syncopated rhythm right across.

As well as the rhythm there is the harsh reality of the ravages of insects on the leaves.” (T.J. McNamara)

Read the review online.

Saying it with Flowers – NZ Herald, October 2008

Wednesday, October 8th, 2008

Artist Neal Palmer has been known to upset the neighbours. In diligent pursuit of his metier, he takes thousands of photographs of plants and flowers. Patrolling the streets of suburbia he’s apt to blur the boundaries should he spot a likely specimen. “Once I got told off when trying to snap a kowhai, but I try to ask permission if I can,” he explains.

Read Claire McCall’s interview with Neal Palmer.

Metro Magazine – Auckland Room, Beach house with a bang

Tuesday, April 1st, 2008

Artist Tony Ogle’s house features a Neal Palmer hibiscus painting.

Ogle has a storage unit full of art, and rotates the works on display to keep them fresh. “I can get a bit complacent about the works.” ¬†The Neal Palmer hisbiscus, however, suits the room so well he never moves it.

New Zealand Herald – September 2007 (White Light)

Friday, September 28th, 2007

New Zealand Herald - Thursday September 20, 2007

“The paintings of Neal Palmer, at the SOCA Gallery in Newton until September 27, are also exceptionally large. The subject, when it is vegetation, is enlarged far beyond its natural size. The results are often vivid and the appropriately titled¬†Flame Thrower is a surge of scarlet flowers spread in great detail across three panels. The painting is given weight by the column of the main stalk of the flax flower and the drooping weight of decaying leaves.” (T.J. McNamara)

– New Zealand Herald

Download pdf [116kb]

Read the article online.

New Zealand Herald – November 2006 (The Sum of Their Parts)

Tuesday, November 14th, 2006

“Precision on a grander scale is apparent in the work of Neal Palmer who is showing at SOCA Gallery in France St, Newton. Individual paintings often consist of panels of aluminium on board. They are held together by a dancing rhythm of intersecting geometric arcs. Behind these are accurately painted pohutukawa and flax. These are exuberant, three times life size, and often startlingly red though with a hint of decay and insect activity. The brushwork emphasises such things as the fibrous nature of flax leaves.

The rhetorical enlargement, geometry and realism celebrate the variety of growth in many forms, from the trumpeting stamen of a big red hibiscus in Feeling Fruity, to the erect thrust of red flax flowers in Big Love.

This accomplished exhibition is called The Sum of Their Parts and surely the total comes to more than their sum.”

T.J. McNamara, nzherald.co.nz

Walk-on Success – Flaxing Lyrical (Sunday Star Times),

Wednesday, November 8th, 2006

Download the pdf.

Natural Talent Blooms – NZ Herald, October 2002

Tuesday, October 8th, 2002

“Making puppets for the famous 90s TV show Spitting Image is about as far as its possible to get from the iconic New Zealand paintings Neal Palmer creates today.” (Estelle Sarney)

Read the article online.

Page 2 of 212